Thanksgiving Eve

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Join us for a special Thanksgiving Eve worship service on Wednesday evening November 21 at 6:30 PM.  Hosted by Rock of Salvation Church & Faith Community Church

Harvest of Thanks

For thousands of years, people all over the world have celebrated harvest time. You’d celebrate too if you had to raise all your own food—it’s a LOT harder than it sounds!

Here’s what you’d have to do:

  • Figure out how much food you’ll need for a whole year
  • Plant your crops
  • Weed and water the plants as they grow
  • Raise (and slaughter) animals for meat
  • Harvest the crops (by hand—machines haven’t been invented yet)
  • Store the food properly so it won’t spoil (no refrigerators!)
  • Eat carefully all winter so you won’t run out of food
  • Save seeds from this year’s crop to plant next year

Even if you worked very hard to raise your food, things could still go wrong. Hail can destroy a crop in minutes. Plants and animals can get diseases. If you get too much rain (or not enough), the crops won’t grow well. If your family gets sick right before harvesttime, your crops might rot in the fields unless you have neighbors to help you.

Do you see why people all over the world give thanks at harvesttime? A good harvest means that so many things have gone well. And it means that people will be able to stay alive until the next harvest. That’s something to be thankful for!

Read All About It
Check out the picture book Giving Thanks: The 1621 Harvest Festival by Kate Waters. In this book a Wampanoag boy named Dancing Moccasins and an English boy named Resolved White tell about the preparations leading up to the harvest celebration that we now think of as the first Thanksgiving. As Dancing Moccasins hunts deer and Resolved does his chores, they both wonder what the day will hold for them. Will they be safe? Will they like each other? Find out!

Name That Pilgrim
How would you like it if your parents named you “Wrestling” or “Humility”? Some Pilgrim parents gave their children first names that would remind them of important things. At the first Thanksgiving there were kids named Remember, Love, Wrestling,
Humility, Resolved, and Peregrine. The baby who was born on the Mayflower was named Oceanus.

Fun Facts
The Pilgrims sailed for 66 days from England to America on a ship called the Mayflower. Only two people died on the stormy journey, and one baby was born, but half of the 100-some Mayflower passengers died of sickness during their first winter in America.

During a terrible storm a Mayflower passenger named John Howland was washed off the ship’s deck. But before he went into the ocean, he caught hold of something and was saved. If he had drowned that day, U.S. President George W. Bush would never have existed, because he is a descendent of John Howland.

The area called “Plymouth Colony”wasn’t empty when the Pilgrims arrived. A Native American tribe called the Wampanoag had been living there for thousands of years. Though the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag were friends for many years, they later fought each other and most of the Wampanoag were killed.

The Pilgrims celebrated Thanksgiving only once that we know of. In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving Day a U.S. holiday.

Make a “ Thankful Calendar”
At the beginning of the month, hang a blank calendar page on your refrigerator with magnets. (Make your own calendar page and decorate it with things that remind you of harvesttime.) Every day, write down something big or little that you’re thankful to God for. Get your whole family to do this, and take turns reading the calendar to each other on Thanksgiving Day. Talk about what it was like to give thanks every day for a whole month.

The Very First Thanksgiving
Did you know that the first Thanksgiving celebration in North America actually happened in Canada?

More than 400 years ago Martin Frobisher, an English explorer and part-time pirate, had a dream. He wanted to find a direct sea route from Europe to Asia. Because Europeans hadn’t traveled west across the Atlantic Ocean much, he didn’t know that his dream was impossible. So off he sailed, but when he found land it wasn’t Asia—it was Canada.

In 1578, Frobisher started a settlement in what’s now called Newfoundland. He was so glad he had survived the long journey that he held a ceremony to give thanks to God.

Many Canadians continued celebrating Thanksgiving off and on through the years, but Thanksgiving didn’t become an official holiday in Canada until 1879.

The First U.S. Thanksgiving

On December 11, 1621, an Englishman named Edward Winslow wrote a letter from his new home in Plymouth Colony to his family back in England. He described the celebration Americans now think of as the first Thanksgiving. The letter went something like this:

My dear family,

We had a very good corn harvest this year, praise God! (Our barley was all right, but we did a really bad job with the peas–we planted them too late, and the summer sun burned them to a crisp.)

After we harvested our crops, we wanted to celebrate. We had enough food to get us through the winter!

Our governor sent out four men to hunt for ducks, geese, or turkey. The hunters brought back so many birds that we had food for a whole week.

We celebrated our harvest for three whole days. Many of our Indian neighbors came to join us, including their greatest chief, whose name was Massasoit. Our friends the Indians killed five deer and gave them to our leaders.

By the goodness of God, we have plenty of food this year, and for that we are very thankful.

With much love,

Edward

Aadapted from Mourt’s Relation: A Journal of
the Pilgrims at Plymouth, first published in 1622.

https://www.thebanner.org/departments/2011/01/harvest-of-thanks

JANUARY 18, 2011 COLUMNS, DISCOVER

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Ordination…

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Do you, Faith Community Church, take this minister to have and hold from this day forward? And do you, the new minister take this church to have and hold from this day forward?

Quick–what do installation/ordination services have in common with weddings? Both are celebrated with reverence and exuberance. Both are centered around human promises that reflect the love and promises of God. Both are in season now! As wedding season fades, installation/ordination season peaks as Candidates are called and as other ministers take advantage of summer breaks to move their families.

Faith Community Church is thanking God for sending them a new minister. Now they are planning an Ordiantion service and want to celebrate the occasion with reverence and exuberance.

There are standard services and forms for Ordination/Installation, but as with weddings, the participants often want to put their own creative spin on the event while maintaining the best of traditions.

#1. Calling plays a significant part in connecting churches and pastors. One way to reflect the biblical tradition of calling is to use incidents of God calling Bible characters in the liturgy. Here’s a start, but don’t stop here. Think of other places in scripture that might apply more directly to the specific calling of the person being ordained or installed.

The voice of the Lord came to Samuel:

And he replied, “Speak, Lord, for your servant is listening.” (1 Sam. 3:10)

The voice of the Lord said to Isaiah: “Whom shall I send, and who will go for me?”

And he replied, “Here am I. Send me.” (Acts 8:30-31)

#2. Songs: What songs have you heard that would be great for these services? One favorite is Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Psalter Hymnal #2.

#3. Special People – Mentors, friends, former pastors and people who encouraged and supported along the way may often be included in an ordination service.

“In ordination the church recognizes the call of God and the call of God’s people on particularly gifted persons, so it sets aside and ordains them to serve on Christ’s behalf, equipping the saints for ministry. Minister of the Word is a denomination-wide office. Unlike elders and deacons, who ordinarily serve as volunteers, commissioned pastors and ministers of the Word are usually in ministry as their main vocation.

“Church members are involved in identifying, nominating, and selecting ordained leaders because we believe that, since Pentecost, the Holy Spirit works through the church to identify those called to lead.

“Ministers of the Word must have a master of divinity degree, except in very exceptional circumstances. They serve as congregational pastors as well as missionaries, chaplains, and professors, and in other approved specialized ministries. Once ordained, they are eligible for call throughout the denomination.

ccd4ef95a8c37c1ff6a3aaa83451ace3“In the ordination service of a minister, a celebration of the Lord’s Supper sometimes follows the vows, with the newly ordained minister administering the sacrament. That minister also gives God’s blessing to the congregation at the end of the worship service for the first time. Until then, he or she would offer a prayer for God’s blessing rather than proclaim the blessing on behalf of God to the people.

“Key elements are vows made by those being ordained, charges to the newly ordained and to the congregation or ministry they will serve, and prayers offered for both groups.

On Sunday October 7th we are pleased to have the Ordination & Communion Service for Pastor Jason Ruis, our new Pastor.  Join us won’t you?

https://www.crcna.org/news-and-views/ordination-best-practices-ministers-elders-and-deacons

Celebration of Life

10501963_300x300_1James L. Dykstra, age 65, of Reeseville, died Tuesday, May 22, 2018 at Beaver Dam Hospital in Beaver Dam.

There will be a memorial gathering at Faith Community Church, 401 Stone Street in Beaver Dam, on Thursday, May 24, 2018 from 12:00 noon to 2:50 p.m. A memorial service will follow at church on Thursday beginning at 3:00 p.m. with Rev. Larry Meyer officiating. Burial will be in Reeseville Cemetery.

James was born on June 13, 1952 in Sheldon, Iowa to Frank and Aletha (Luitjens) Dykstra. On May 25, 1974, he was united in marriage with Joan Tamminga in Friesland, Wisconsin. Jim was a graduate of South Dakota State University Pharmacy School. In 1976, he purchased Abel Drug Store in Reeseville, which became Village Pharmacy, and he was the area pharmacist until he retired in November of 2014. Jim loved his Lord, loved his family and friends, and loved to fish. He was a member of Faith Community Church in Beaver Dam.

Survivors include his wife, Joan Dykstra of Reeseville; two children, Joshua (Shanna) Dykstra of Mayville and Jill Dykstra of Israel; three grandchildren, Julian, Laci, and Tessa Dykstra; his mother, Aletha Dykstra of Colorado Springs, CO; his sister, Pat (Wayne) DeKam of Colorado Springs, CO; sisters-in-law, Joyce Van Buren of Brandon and June Tamminga of Friesland; special friends, Abby and Emma Kooiman; nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by his father, Frank Dykstra.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made in James Dykstra’s name to Faith Community Christian Reformed Church, memo: Jill Dykstra Israel.

End of Year Celebration!!!!

FC-end-2018

Friendship Club END of YEAR CELEBRATION!

Monday May 21 at 6:30 PM (Volunteers & visitors can arrive @ 6:15 PM)

Our LAST meeting for the year! We will showcase Camp Reports and our talents!

So bring yourself, a story, a medal, a trophy…

whatever you would like to share.

ALSO – Bring your favorite Ice Cream topping for our traditional Summer Sundae Treat at the end!

A ministry WITH people who have disabilities at

Faith Community Church, 401 Stone Street, Beaver Dam, WI

More information about Friendship Club

Friesland Community Men’s Chorus

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We are a dedicated Group of men who love the Lord and love to sing His praise and glory. We have been doing our work for him since 1982. We are men from all walks of life and from several areas of Wisconsin, 11 different denominations and 27 different churches.

2018 Concert Schedule (Tentative)
All Sundays unless specified
March
4 – Beaver Dam Faith Community Church  9:30 AM
11- Waupun Catholic 2:00 PM
18- Randolph Methodist 10:15 AM
April
8 – Cambria Presbyterian 10:00 AM
15- Oshkosh Wesley United Methodist 9:00 AM
22- Beaver Dam Chapel of Arch Angels 2:00 PM
29- Rosendale Peace Lutheran 9:00 AM
May
6 – Brandon Reformed 10:00 AM 305 Main Street
20- Mayville St Paul Lutheran 2:00 PM 165 Walnut Street
27- Portage Grace Bible 9:00 AM 2939 Cty Hwy CX
June
3 – Pardeeville Grace Presbyterian 7:00 PM N7631 Hwy 22
10 – Oshkosh Countryside 9:30 AM W1483 Burr Oak Rd, Hwy 44
17- Markesan United Methodist 9:30 AM 74 Catherine Street
24- Friesland 1st Reformed (End of year concert) 6:30 PM 107 Winnebago Street
September
16- Rosendale Peace Lutheran (Benefit) 2:00 PM
17- (Monday) Cambria – Dave & Linda Hughes Barn (Benefit) 7:00 PM

http://fcmchorus.org/

Call 920-382-1370 if you would like to join, Purchase a CD (may also be purchased on our website – see link above) or for any other information.